GitHub and Azure Pipelines

A few weeks ago Microsoft announced that Visual Studio Team Services was being replaced/rebranded by a collection of services under the brand Azure DevOps. One of the services that make up Azure DevOps is Azure Pipelines which provides a platform for continuous integration and continuous delivery for a huge number of languages on Windows, Linux, and Mac.

As part of this change, Azure Pipelines is now available on the GitHub marketplace. In this post, I am going to pick one of my existing repos and see if I can get it building from GitHub using Azure Pipelines. I’m sure Microsoft or GitHub has documentation, but I’m attempting this without outside sources.

GitHub Marketplace

Make sure you have a GitHub account with a repo you want to build. For this post, I’m going to be using my ASP.NET Core Entity Framework repo. Now that you have the basic prep out of the way head over to the GitHub Marketplace and search for Azure Pipelines or click here.

Scroll to the bottom of the page to the Pricing and setup section. There is a paid option that is the default option. Click the Free option and then click Install it for free.

On the next page, you will get a summary of your order. Click the Complete order and begin installation button.

On the next page, you can select which repos to apply the installation to. For this post, I’m going to select a single repo. After making your choice on repos click the Install button.

Azure DevOps

After clicking install you will be thrown into the account authorization/creation process with Microsoft. After getting authorized you will get to the first set up in the setup process with Azure. You will need to select an organization and a project to continue. If you don’t have these setup yet there are options to create them.

After the process complete you will be land on the New pipeline creation process where you need to select the repo to use. Clicking the repo you want to use will move you to the next step.

The next step is a template selection. My sample is an ASP.NET Core application so I selected the ASP.NET Core template. Selecting a template will move you to the next step.

The next page will show you a yaml file based on the template you selected. Make any changes your project requires (my repo had two projects so I had to change the build to point to which project I wanted to build).

Next, you will be prompted to commit the yaml file to source control. Select your options and click Save and run.

After your configuration gets saved a build will be queued. If all goes well you will see your app being built. If everything works you will see something like this build results page.

Wrapping Up

GitHub and Microsoft have done a great job on this integration. I was surprised at how smooth the setup was. It was also neat to see a project that I created on Windows being built on Linux.

If you have a public repo on GitHub and need a way to build give Azure Pipelines a try.

Identity Server: External Authentication using Twitter

This post is going to cover adding authentication using Twitter to the same project that has been used in all of my IdentityServer examples. The same basic idea would apply to almost any third party authentication setup so this should give you a good starting point for any integration. The starting point of the code can be found here.

Create Twitter App

Before any code changes create a new application on Twitter via this page. Click Create New App to begin the process.

On the Create an application page enter all the requested information. Note that the website won’t allow a localhost address. If you don’t have a real address for your application just enter a random URL as I did here. When finished click Create your Twitter application.

Now that we have an application click on the Keys and Access Tokens tab. We will need both the Consumer Key and Consumer Secret when we get to the Identity Application.

Identity Application Changes

Now that we have a Twitter application ready to go let us dive into the changes needed to the Identity Application. The first step is to add a reference to Microsoft.AspNetCore.Authentication.Twitter via NuGet.

Next in the ConfigureServices function of the Startup class after app.UseIdentityServer() add the following.

app.UseTwitterAuthentication(new TwitterOptions
{
    AuthenticationScheme = "Twitter",
    DisplayName = "Twitter",
    SignInScheme = "Identity.External",
    ConsumerKey = Configuration["Authentication:Twitter:ConsumerKey"],
    ConsumerSecret = Configuration["Authentication:Twitter:ConsumerSecret"]
});

The first three options should a straight forward enough. The next two are the values from the Twitter application I mentioned above. In this example, I am storing the values using User Secrets which get pulled out of configuration. For more details on how to set up secrets, you can see this post.

The above are all the changes required. The Identity Application will now allow users to auth using Twitter.

Logging in using Twitter

As you can see below the login page now has a button for Twitter.

When the user chooses to log in using Twitter they are shown the following page where they must approve access to their Twitter account from your application.

If this is the first time a user has logged in with Twitter they will be prompted to enter an email address to finish registration.

Wrapping up

As you can see adding external authentication is super simple. Check out the Microsoft Docs on Twitter Auth (ASP.NET Core 2.0 so look out for differences if you are not on the preview bits) and IdentityServer Docs on External Auth for more information.

The finished code can be found here.

 

Visual Studio 2017 error encountered while cloning the remote Git repository

Going through the process of getting Visual Studio 2017 installed on all my machines has been pretty smooth. The new installer works great and makes it much clearer what needs to be installed.

The issue

The one issue I have had, which was only an issue on one install, is an error when trying to clone a repo from GitHub. I say GitHub but really it would be a problem with any Git repo. The following is the error I was getting.

Error encountered while cloning the remote repository: Git failed with a fatal error.
CloneCommand.ExecuteClone

The solution

After searching I found a lot of things to try. I uninstalled and reinstalled Git for Windows multiple times using both the Visual Studio Installer and the stand alone installer. I finally stumbled onto this forum thread which had a solution that worked for me. The following is a quote of the reason for the issue and a fix posted by J Wyman who is a software engineer for Microsoft’s Developer Division.

After intensive investigation we were able to determine that Git was accidentally loading an incorrect version of libeay32.dll and ssleay32.dll due to library loading search order and precedence rules. Multiple users have confirmed that copying the binaries from the “<VS_INSTALL>\Common7\IDE\CommonExtensions\Microsoft\TeamFoundation\Team Explorer\Git\mingw32\bin\” folder to the “<VS_INSTALL>\Common7\IDE\CommonExtensions\Microsoft\TeamFoundation\Team Explorer\Git\mingw32\libexec\git-core\” folder completely resolved the issue for him.

Any other users seeing similar problem should attempt the same solution.

I hope this gets other people up and running as it did me. My only worry about this fix is what happens with Git gets updated.