Change ASP.NET Core from npm to Yarn

Over the past couple of months, I have been having some issues with npm. Between the upgrading of npm Windows begin a pain and a version incompatibility with node I have just gotten frustrated with it. This post is going to cover the steps to use Yarn as a replacement for npm in an ASP.NET Core application.

Installation

The first step is to get Yarn installed. Head over to this site and download and run the installer for your operating system.

For Visual Studio, Mads Kristensen created an extension for Yarn that makes the integration much better. The installer for the extension can be downloaded from here.

Conversion

Open a command prompt in the same directory as your project’s  package.json file and run the following command.

This will create a  yarn.lock and lay out the  node_modules folder using Yarn’s resolution algorithm.

I did hit the following error when I did the  yarn command. I left out the specific file that it had an issue with because I am sure yours would be different.

To clear the issue I just deleted the  node_modules directory and let Yarn recreate it. It might also work to use a command prompt with administrator privileges.

Visual Studio

With the Yarn extension installed there are a couple of settings that are helpful to change. All the setting we will be changing can be found under the Tools > Options menu. The first is to have  yarn install run when the  package.json is saved. Look under  Web > Yarn Installer for this option.

The second setting is to turn off automatic NPM restore so packages are restored twice. This requires the options under NPM to be set to false. The options can be found in  Projects and Solutions > Web Package Management > Package Restore.

The extension helps with Yarn integration, but the integration still isn’t as full-featured as using NPM. At my current level of frustration having to manually restore package when I open a project on a new PC is totally worth it.

Wrapping Up

So far Yarn has been great and I have not hit any issues, but my usage has also been limited. It seems like a solid alternative to NPM.

Make sure and check out Yarn’s official post on migrating from NPM which can be found here. Of specific interest will be the CLI command comparison which can be found here.

Upgrading to npm 3 or 4

As part of writing a post on getting Angular 2 working with ASP.NET Core I needed to upgrade to npm verson 3. All went well on my main machine, but when I tried it on my laptop things didn’t go so well. No matter how many times I ran  npm install -g npm the version returned via  npm -v always returned 1.4.9.

After a bit of googling I came across this post on Stack Overflow. The post also points to npm’s github wiki on the upgrade process which can be found here. I am going to go over the option that I used to get my laptop upgraded.

Open an administrator command prompt and navigate to the install directory for nodejs. This should be either  C:\Program Files (x86)\nodejs or  C:\Program Files\nodejs and then run  npm install npm@latest.

Now if you run  npm -v you should see a 3.x version of npm.

npm 4

Since writing this npm 4 has come out. The above should still apply if you find that npm is stuck as a previous version. Check out the npm release notes page for details.