Azure Repos and Azure Pipelines

Last week’s post looked at using GitHub with Azure Pipelines. This week I’m going to take the same project and walk through adding it to Azure Repos and setting a build up using Azure Pipelines. I will be using the code from this GitHub repo minus the azure-pipelines.yml file that was added in last weeks post.

Creating a Project

I’m not going to walk you through the sign-up process, but if you don’t have an account you can sign up for Azure DevOps here. Click the Create project button in the upper right corner.

On the dialog that shows enter a project name. I’m using the same name that was on the GitHub repo that the code came from. Click Create to continue.

Adding to the Repo

After the project finishes the creation process use the menu on the left and select Repos.

Since the project doesn’t currently have any files the Repos page lists a number of options for getting files added. I’m going to use the Clone in VS Code option and then copy the files from my GitHub repo. If I weren’t trying to avoid including the pipeline yaml file an easier option would be to use the Import function and clone the repo directly.

I’m not going to go through the details of using one of the above methods to get the sample code into Azure Repos. It is a git based repo and the options for getting code uploaded are outlined on the page above.

Set up a build

Now that we have code in a repo you should see the view change to something close to the following screenshot. Hit the Set up build to start the process of creating a build pipeline for the new repo. This should be pretty close to the last half of last week’s post, but I want to include it here so this post can stand alone.

On the next page select Azure Repos as the source of code.

Next, select the repo that needs to be built for the new pipeline.

Template selection is next. Based on your code a template will be suggested, but don’t just take the default. For whatever reason, it suggested a .NET Desktop template for my sample which is actually ASP.NET Core based. Select your template to move on to the next step.

The next screen will show you the YAML that will be used to build your code. My repo contains two projects so I had to tweak the YAML to tell it which project to build, but otherwise, the default would have worked. After you have made any changes that your project needs click Save and run.

The last step before the actual build is to commit the build YAML file to your Azure Repo. Make any changes you need on the dialog and then click Save and run to start the first build of your project.

The next page will show you the status of the build in real time. When the build is complete you should see something like the following with the results.

Wrapping Up

As expected using Azure Repos with Azure Pipelines works great. If you haven’t yet give Azure DevOps a try. Microsoft has a vast offering with this set of products that are consistently getting better and better.


Also published on Medium.

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